Building a Script File for Web Application

To build the script file, do the following:

  1. Open the CitraTest Development environment using the menu sequence depicted by Figure 1.

    Figure 1 : Opening the CitraTest console

  2. To create a new script, next, select the New option from the File menu of Figure 2.

    Figure 2 : Creating a new script

  3. In the next screen (see Figure 3), a Script Type and Development Type need to be selected. The VU Load Test script is used for stress testing applications. For measuring the availability and responsiveness of an application, the default Standard Script has to be used. Therefore, select the Standard Script option from Figure 3. Then, select VisualBasic 6.0 Project as the Development Type and finally, click the ok button in Figure 3.

    Figure 3 : Selecting a Script type and a Development type

  4. Next, Figure 4 will appear prompting you to specify the name of the new VB script that is being created, and the directory to which it should be saved. Let us name the VB script in our example as SAWebSite. Specify this name against the File name text box of Figure 4, and click the Open button therein.

    Figure 4 : Providing a name and location for the new VB project

  5. Next, specify the directories to which the images to be captured and the search areas to be defined need to saved. A Search Area is defined when a specific area in a page needs to be searched for the existence of an image. By default, the images and search areas will be stored in the same directory as the VB script file. You can change the location for the images and search areas, if need be, using Figure 5. A default directory for fonts will also be displayed in Figure 5. All the fonts that are registered with the displayed directory will alone be recognized by CitraTest. You can set a different font directory by specifying a different path in the Set Font Directory text box. The buttons adjacent to every text box can be utilized to browse for a particular location.

    Figure 5 : Specifying the path to the images and search areas

  6. Clicking on the Script Logic tab of Figure 5 will display the default termination logic (see Figure 6) for the VB script. During playback, if any of the conditions specified in the VB script fails, then the displayed script will automatically run and abort the script execution. If desired, you can modify this script.

    Figure 6 : The default termination logic

  7. Once the path and script changes are made, click on the ok button in Figure 6 to proceed with the script creation.
  8. The script window will then open (see Figure 7).

    Figure 7 : The script window

  9. When a VB script file is created, an output file with the same name as the script file will also be created by default, in the script file directory. This output file has the extension .timer.csv. Therefore, the default output file that corresponds to the script file in our example will be SAWebSite.timer.csv. This output file will store the availability and response time values, which will later be extracted by the eG agent and reported to the eG manager.
  10. Next, begin capturing the images, clicks, and key strokes that form part of the user transactions that are to be emulated. Before commencing image capturing, it would help if you prepare a list of broad steps that need to be followed to access the application to be monitored. These broad steps can then be broken down into individual clicks and key strokes. This exercise will help you identify the shortest and the most efficient sequence of steps that will result in a valid user request.

    Since our example involves accessing the Singapore Airlines web site, the first step would be to open the Internet Explorer. This, in turn, involves restoring the Windows desktop and then clicking on the Internet Explorer icon on it.

    To restore the Windows desktop, you need to click on the Restore Desktop button on the Windows taskbar. To record this click, first, capture the Restore Desktop button image. To achieve this, first, enable image capturing by clicking on the button on the tool bar of Figure 7.

  11. Once image capturing is enabled, the mouse cursor will change to resemble a ‘plus’ (+) sign. Now, switch to the Windows desktop, place the ‘+’ cursor on the left top corner of the Restore Desktop button, click there using your left mouse button, and then, with the left mouse button pressed drag the cursor until it covers the entire Restore Desktop button (see Figure 8). As you drag, a dashed line will appear indicating the area that has been covered.

    Figure 8 : Capturing the image of the Restore Desktop button

  12. While the image is being captured, a small window will appear indicating the X and Y coordinates defining the current position of the image, the width of the image, and its height (see Figure 8).
  13. Once you release the left mouse button, you will return to Figure 2, which will now display the captured image (see Figure 9).

    Note:

    Remember the following while capturing an image:

    • It is recommended that you keep the images small. Larger the image, longer the time taken for script execution.
    • It is not always necessary for you to capture an entire image. Sometimes, capturing a small portion of the image will suffice. This is more so in the case of   images that need not be clicked on. Therefore, before attempting to capture an image, ascertain its purpose and then proceed.

    Figure 9 : The captured Restore Desktop image

  14. Save the image by clicking on the Save button on the tool bar of Figure 9. As already mentioned, by default, images captured will be stored as BMPs in the Images directory. Hence, by default, the Images directory will open in the Save As dialog box. Specify a name for the image (in our example, this is RestoreDesktop) in the Filename text box, and click the Save button in Figure 10 to save the image to the Images directory.

    Figure 10 : Saving the Restore Desktop image

  15. Now that the image has been saved, it is now time to instruct the VB script to click on the Restore Desktop button. To achieve this, first minimize the image window of Figure 9. This will reveal the script window depicted by Figure 7. Now, click on the clk button on the tool bar of Figure 7. Figure 11 will then appear wherein you need to select the image to be clicked on from the Image Names list box. This list box will display all the images that are currently available in the Images directory. In our example, since RestoreDesktop.bmp is the only image currently available in that directory, only RestoreDesktop.bmp is displayed in the Image Names list box. Since this is the image to be clicked on, select it.

    Figure 11 : Clicking on the Restore Desktop button

  16. If the chosen image has to be searched for in a search area, specify the name of the search area in the Search Area text box (see Figure 11). As no search areas have been defined yet for our example, leave it as none. By default, the script will search for the chosen image for 50 seconds, after which it will timeout. This is the standard_timeout period for a script. If the standard_timeout period does not apply to the selected image, you can specify a different value in the Searching Timeout in Secs text box. For our example, however, the standard_timeout period holds good (see Figure 11).

    Note:

    By default, the standard_timeout period is 50 seconds. You can change this default setting using the Playback Options dialog box that appears upon selecting Playback Options from the Playback menu on the script window.

  17. Next, select the mouse button to be used for clicking on the selected image. The RestoreDesktop.bmp image in our example is to be clicked on using the default Left mouse button (see Figure 11). Therefore, select the Left option from the Button section. Similarly, since the RestoreDesktop.bmp image is to be clicked only once, select the Single option from the Click section (see Figure 11).
  18. Finally, click on the ok button in Figure 11.
  19. Upon clicking, CitraTest will automatically create a script corresponding to the click event that was just configured. This script will automatically appear in the script window (see Figure 12).

    Figure 12 : VB script for clicking on the RestoreDesktop.bmp

  20. Also, note that the default termination logic (of Figure 6) has been appended to the script (see Figure 12). This means that if the click event fails, the termination script will be invoked and script execution will be immediately aborted.
  21. The next step is to ensure that the desktop refreshes once the Restore Desktop button is clicked. Pressing the F5 key on the keyboard refreshes the desktop. To instruct the VB script to do the same, click on the key button on the tool bar of Figure 12.
  22. Figure 13 will then appear. From the Special Keys list of Figure 13, select F5. As the F5 key is to be “pressed”, select the Key Press option from the Keystroke Action for Special Keys section. Next, click on the Add to Script Code >> button adjacent to the Special Keys list. When this is done, the script code corresponding to the “F5 key press” will appear in the Keystroke Script Code list (see Figure 14). Finally, click on the ok button in Figure 14 to add the script code to the script window (see Figure 15).

    Figure 13 : Selecting the F5 key

    Figure 14 : Adding the F5 key to the script

    Figure 15 : Script for pressing the F5 key

  23. The script will now ensure that the Windows desktop is restored and refreshed. The step to be handled next by the script is, double-clicking on the Internet Explorer icon on the desktop to open the Internet Explorer. To achieve this, an image of the Internet Explorer icon needs to be first captured, and then a click event needs to be associated with it.
  24. To capture the Internet Explorer icon’s image, first, press the F11 key on the keyboard to enable image capturing. Capture the required icon using the same procedure explained earlier (see Figure 16).

    Figure 16 : Capturing the Internet Explorer Icon

  25. Upon releasing the left mouse button, Figure 17 will appear using which the captured image is to be saved to the Images directory. From Figure 17, it is evident that the Internet Explorer icon in our example has been saved as IE.bmp (see Figure 17).

    Figure 17 : The saved Internet Explorer icon

  26. Every image that is captured using CitraTest will consist of a default Click spot. If a click event is associated with an image, then, during playback, the VB script will attempt to click only on the image’s Click spot. If this spot is not clearly defined, the VB script will be unable to click on the corresponding image, and eventually, the script will fail. Therefore, if you even slightly suspect the correctness of the default Click spot, then it is recommended that you change it immediately. The default Click spot associated with the IE.bmp in our example, has been indicated by Figure 18.

    Figure 18 : The default click on spot of IE.bmp

  27. In Figure 18, the default Click spot appears as a small, red dot just above the phrase, Internet Explorer. Say that this spot needs to be redefined. To do so, first, click on the button on the tool bar of Figure 18.
  28. Then, bring your cursor down to the IE.bmp image and click on the spot that needs to be set as the new Click spot. Figure 19 reveals the new click spot for the IE.bmp in our example.The new Click Spot

    Figure 19 : Defining a new click spot for IE.bmp

  29. Next, associate a click event with the IE.bmp. To do so, first, minimize Figure 17 to open Figure 15. Then, click on the clk button on the tool bar of Figure 15. From the Image Names list box of Figure 20 that comes up, select IE.bmp, and then select the Left option from the Button section. Since the IE.bmp has to be double-clicked, choose the Double option from the Click section, and finally, click the ok button to generate the corresponding VB script.

    Figure 20 : Clicking on the IE.bmp

  30. Figure 21 will then appear bearing the VB script that was automatically generated for the above-mentioned condition.

    Figure 21 : Script for double-clicking on the IE.bmp

  31. Here again, note that the default termination logic has been appended to the script.
  32. The complete script now takes care of restoring the desktop, refreshing it, and double-clicking on the Internet Explorer icon on the desktop. When the IE icon is double-clicked, naturally, the Internet Explorer window will open. Once the IE window opens, the URL of the Singapore Airlines web site should be entered in the Address box of the window, so that the web site is accessed. The URL is:  http://www.singaporeair.com/saa/app/saa.
  33. The first step towards typing the URL in the Address box of the Internet Explorer, is to click on the Address box. To achieve this, first, capture the image of the Address box by pressing F11 to enable image capturing, and proceeding in the manner depicted by Figure 22 below.

    Figure 22 : Capturing the image of the Address box

  34. Figure 23 reveals that the image has been captured and has been saved as addressbar.bmp.

    Figure 23 : The captured image has been saved as addressbar.bmp

  35. Typically, the Address box will contain the default URL to connect to. As soon as the Internet Explorer opens, it will try and connect to the default URL only. This default setting is system-specific, i.e., it will vary from one system to another. In our example, the default URL is about:blank (see Figure 23). If the same script is executed on another system, it will look for about:blank in the Address box of the IE in that system also. If the script does not find the same entry, it will fail. To avoid this confusion, it is imperative that the script be built in such a way that the default contents of the Address box are ignored.
  36. To achieve this, the text area of the Address box needs to be masked. For that, first, click on the Msk button (fifth from the right) on the tool bar of Figure 24. Then, move to the image below and mark the text box area that is to be masked (see Figure 24). Once the text area is masked, the color of the whole image will change as indicated by Figure 24. This color-change is not permanent. The original color of the image and its new color will flash alternately. Save the image once again.

    Figure 24 : Masking the text area of the Address box

  37. Next, associate a click event with the addressbar.bmp image. Once again, minimize the image window (see Figure 24) to open the script window (Figure 21), click on the clk button on the tool bar of the script window, select addressbar.bmp from the Image Names list of Figure 25, select the Left option from the Button section, and the Single option from the Click section. Finally, click on the ok button.

    Figure 25 : Clicking on the Address box

  38. A script to the above effect and the default termination logic will then appear in the script window. Now, proceed to type the URL of web site in the Address box. To do so, first, click on the key button on the tool bar of Figure 26

    Figure 26 : Script for clicking on the Address box

  39. In the Text String text box of Figure 27 that appears, specify the complete URL of the Singapore Airlines site. This would be, http://www.singaporeair.com/saa/app/saa. Then, click on the Add to Script Code >> button corresponding to the Text String text box. This will generate a script code to the above effect and display it in the Keystroke Script Code box (see Figure 28).

    Figure 27 : Typing the web site’s URL

    Figure 28 : Generating the script code for typing the URL

  40. Once the URL is typed, the Enter key on the keyboard should be pressed to initiate the web site connection. In order to make sure that the script does the same, select the Enter option from the Special Keys list box and click on the Add to Script Code >> button adjacent to it (see Figure 29). The corresponding script code will then be displayed in the Keystroke Script Code box (see Figure 30).

    Figure 29 : Selecting the Enter key

    Figure 30 : Script code for the Enter key press

  41. Finally, click on the ok button in Figure 30.
  42. The Keystroke Script Codes that were generated earlier (see Figure 30) will then be appended to the script window of Figure 31.

    Figure 31 : Script for typing the URL and pressing the Enter key

  43. Once the URL is typed, the Singapore Airlines home page will be downloaded. The next step therefore, is to ensure that the page has downloaded successfully. Here, two images indicate the successful page download.

    1. The Singapore Airlines logo
    2. The Done message on the status bar

    As we need to keep the images small, capture a small part of the Singapore Airlines logo as depicted by Figure 32.

    Figure 32 : Capturing the image of the Singapore Airlines logo

  44. The image has been saved as SAHome.bmp (see Figure 33).

    Figure 33 : Saving the Singapore Airlines logo as SAHome.bmp

  45. Then, capture the Done message on the status bar by following the procedure explained earlier. Save the new image as DoneSAHome.bmp.
  46. Once both the images are ready, you need to ensure that the script waits for the appearance of the logo and the Done message. For that, first, switch to the script window and click on the w / v button on its tool bar. Then, select the DoneSAHome and SAHome images from the Image Names list (see Figure 34), choose the Wait For ALL Images option, and click the ok button in Figure 34.

    Figure 34 : Generating a “wait for” script for the SAHome and DoneSAHome images

  47. The “wait for” script will then appear in the script window (see Figure 35).

    Figure 35 : Script that will wait for the display of the Singapore Airlines logo and Done message

  48. Next, let us try to build into the script, the capability to track the time taken by the Singapore Airlines home page to download. The Timer component of CitraTest facilitates this tracking. To insert a timer component, first, place the cursor just above the “wait for” script in the script window (see Figure 35). Then, click on the button on the tool bar of Figure 35. Figure 36 appears, prompting you to provide a name for the timer that is being inserted. Let us call the timer in our example SAHome. Clicking on the ok button in Figure 36 will open the script window, which will now display the code, StartTimer (“SAHome”), just above the “wait for” script (see Figure 37).

    Figure 36 : Inserting the SAHome timer for tracking the download time of the Singapore Airlines home page

  49. Stop the timer after the “wait for” script (see Figure 37) by clicking on the button. This will include a StopTimer code for the new timer (see Figure 37).

    Figure 37 : Script tracking the time taken by the Singapore Airlines page for downloading

  50. The Timer component then calculates the difference between the start and stop times, and returns the time that the Singapore Airlines Home page actually took to download. This becomes the response time of that page. The timers inserted in the script will appear as “descriptors” in the eG suite, and will report the availability and responsiveness of the pages they track; in this case, the name of the descriptor will be SAHome, and it will report the availability and response time of the Singapore Airlines Home web page.
  51. The script should now try to access the page which provides the Flight status. For that, the script needs to move the mouse pointer over the Schedules link on the panel at the top of the Singapore Airlines page, and then, click on the Flight Status option in its drop-down menu. To achieve this, first, capture the image of the Schedules link as depicted by Figure 38.

    Figure 38 : Capturing the image of the Schedules link

  52. This image has been saved as Schedules.bmp (see Figure 39).

    Figure 39 : Saving the Schedules images as Schedules.bmp

  53. To move the mouse pointer over the Schedules link, first, click on the clk button on the tool bar of the script window. Select the Schedules image from the Image Names list of Figure 40, and select the None option from the Click section. Finally, click on the ok button in Figure 40

    Figure 40 : Generating the script for moving the mouse pointer over the Schedules link

  54. The generated script will be appended to the script window (see Figure 41).

    Figure 41 : Script for for moving the mouse pointer over the Schedules link

  55. Next, capture the image of the Flight Status option in the Schedules menu (see Figure 42).

    Figure 42 : Capturing the Flight Status image

  56. Name the file as FlightStatus.bmp (see Figure 43), and then, associate a click event with it as depicted by Figure 44.

    Figure 43 : Saving the Flight Status image

    Figure 44 : Associating a Single click with the Flight Status image

  57. The script that handles the afore-mentioned will then appear (see Figure 45) in the script window.

    Figure 45 : Script for clicking on the FlightStatus.bmp image

  58. Upon clicking the Flight Status option, the Flight Status page will appear. Using this page, the status of a particular flight will have to be retrieved. To check whether the Flight Status page has completely downloaded, let us use the page title – Flight Status – as an indicator. The Done image that appears on the status bar of the IE window can also be used as an indicator. First, capture the image of a small part of the page title as depicted by Figure 46 below.

    Figure 46 : Capturing the image of the page title – Flight Status

  59. Save the image as Status.bmp. Instead of capturing the Done image again, let us use one of the existing Done images. Now, instruct the script to wait for both these images, by first, clicking on the w / v button on the script window’s tool bar. Then, select the Status image and any of the Done images, and click on the Wait For ALL Images option. Finally, click the ok button.

    Figure 47 : Waiting for the Done and Status images

  60. Note that the script window of Figure 48 reveals the code for waiting for the Done and Status images.

    Figure 48 : Script for waiting for the Done and Status images

  61. As before, track the time taken by the Flight Status page to download by starting and stopping a timer named FlightStatusPage (see Figure 49).

    Figure 49 : Setting a timer for the Flight Status page

  62. The script should then attempt to query the availability information pertaining to a specific flight using the Flight Status page. For that, the script should first enter a specific Flight Number in this page. To achieve this, first, capture an image of a small portion of the Flight Number field. Figure 50 reveals that the image has been captured and has been saved as Flightnumber.bmp.

    Figure 50 : Saving the image of the Flight Number field

  63. Prior to keying in the flight number, the cursor should be positioned in the Flight Number text box. To achieve this, associate a click event with the Flightnumber.bmp image (see Figure 51).

    Figure 51 : Clicking on the Flightnumber.bmp

  64. To key in the flight number, click on the key button on the tool bar of the script window, and then specify a flight number in the Text String text box of Figure 52. In our example, 409 is the flight number. Once the text is specified, click on the Add to Script Code >> button corresponding to the text box, to generate the relevant script code for the keystrokes (see Figure 52). This script code will be added to the Keystroke Script Code list of Figure 52.

    Figure 52 : Typing the flight number to be queried

  65. Then, click the ok button in Figure 52.
  66. Our example seeks to figure out at what time the flight number 409 leaves Chennai on the current date. Therefore, the Departing from radio button has to be selected next. Since this option is selected by default, proceed to select the city from which the flight 409 departs. In other words, ensure that the script selects Chennai from the City list box. To click on the City list box, first, capture the whole/part of its image as depicted by Figure 53.

    Figure 53 : Capturing an image of the City list box

  67. The captured image has been named as CitySelect.bmp (see Figure 54). Figure 54 also indicates the default click spot of the image.

    Figure 54 : The default click spot of the CitySelect.bmp

  68. To be on the safer side, let us position the click spot on the down arrow at the end of the CitySelect.bmp image. To achieve this, click on the button on the tool bar of Figure 55, and then, click on the down arrow at the left corner of the CitySelect image. Figure 55 indicates the new click spot.

    Figure 55 : The new click spot for the CitySelect.bmp

  69. Now, instruct the script to click on the CitySelect.bmp. To do this, click on the clk button on the tool bar of the script window, select CitySelect.bmp from the Image Names list of Figure 56, and then, click the ok button therein.

    Figure 56 : Clicking on CitySelect.bmp

  70. Upon clicking the CitySelect.bmp, a drop-down list of cities will appear. The quickest way of getting to the Chennai option in this list would be to press c using your keyboard, and then pressing the Page Down key. This will take you nearer to the Chennai option. You can then capture an image of the option and associate a click event with it.

    Let us begin by recording the key strokes. For that, click on the key button on the script window’s tool bar, and enter c in the Text String text box. Then, click on the Add to Script Code >> button next to the text box to generate the corresponding script code.

    Figure 57 : Entering ‘n’ to navigate to the cities beginning with the letter N

  71. Next, select the Page Down key from the Special Keys list and add it to the Keystroke Script Code list by clicking on the Add to Script Code >> button (see Figure 57).
  72. To click on the Chennai option, first, capture an image of the option as depicted by Figure 58.

    Figure 58 : Capturing an image of the Chennai option

  73. Save the image as chennai.bmp, and associate a click event with it. The VB script will get updated accordingly.

    Figure 59 : Script for clicking on the chennai.bmp

  74. By default, the current date will be displayed against the Date field in the Flight Status page. This setting therefore, need not be disturbed. Hence, let us proceed to click on the go button.
  75. In situations where a page element to be clicked on is very similar (in both name and appearance) to another element in the same page, the probability of a script failure is very high, as the test script might fail to differentiate between the two elements. This is where the concept of a Relative Search Area comes into play. Relative Search Areas are used to limit the image and text recognition logic to a specified region of the screen. When a specific region in a page is set as a Relative Search Area, and this area is assigned to an image to be clicked on, then, during playback, the script will search only this region for the image. In our example, note that the Flight Status page consists of two gO buttons (see Figure 58). In order to enable the script to tell one from the other, let us define a Relative Search Area. The on-screen position of relative search areas, during script playback, is tied to a “relative reference” anchor image. Therefore, let us begin by capturing the anchor image.
  76. An anchor image should be from the same page as the relative search area. Any of the existing (already captured) images from that page can be used for this purpose. For our example however, let us capture a new anchor image in the manner depicted by Figure 60.

    Figure 60 : Capturing an anchor image

  77. Next, save the image as Anchor.bmp (see Figure 61).

    Figure 61 : Saving the image as Anchor.bmp

  78. Next, proceed to capture an image of the search area as depicted by Figure 62.

    Figure 62 : Capturing an image of the Relative Search Area

    Note:

    While capturing a relative search area, ensure that the image to be clicked on is also captured as part of the area (see Figure 62). In our example, this is the go button.

  79. Once the image is captured on to the image window, instead of saving it as a bitmap, select the File -> Save As -> Relative Area option to save it as a relative search area (see Figure 63).

    Figure 63 : Saving the captured image as a Relative Search Area

  80. Figure 64 will then appear wherein you need to specify a name for the relative search area, and bind it to the anchor image, Anchor.bmp (see Figure 64).

    Figure 64 : Binding a relative search area to the anchor image

  81. Finally, click the ok button in Figure 64.
  82. Then, proceed to click on the go button, by first, capturing an image of the go button (see Figure 65).

    Figure 65 : Capturing an image of the GO button

  83. Save the image as GObutton.bmp (see Figure 66).

    Figure 66 : Saving the GO button image as GObutton.bmp

  84. Then, return to the script window, and click on the clk button on its tool bar. From Figure 67 that appears, select the GObutton.bmp from the Image Names list, and specify the full path to its relative search area in the Search Area text box. By default, relative search areas will be saved to the Images directory only. Finally, click on the ok button in Figure 67.

    Figure 67 : Clicking on the GO button

  85. The script window will then display the corresponding script (see Figure 68).

    Figure 68 : Script for clicking on the GO button

  86. Once the GO button is clicked on, the status of the specified flight will be made available to you. To calculate the time taken for the query to execute, first, instruct the script to ‘wait for’ the title of the results page to appear. Therefore, proceed to capture the page title as depicted by Figure 69.

    Figure 69 : Capturing an image of the results page

  87. Save the image as StatusResult.bmp. Next, navigate to the script window to build a script that will wait for the results page to appear. To do this, click on the w / v button on the tool bar, select the StatusResult.bmp from the Image Names list of Figure 70, select the Wait For ANY Image option, and finally, click the ok button.

    Figure 70 : Waiting for the StatusResult.bmp  to appear

  88. The script to the above effect will then appear in the script window. Then, start and stop a timer named FlightStatusCheck to record the query execution time. The StartTimer code should be inserted before this “wait for” script, and the StopTimer code should be inserted after the “wait for” script (see Figure 71).

    Figure 71 : Script for recording the query execution time

  89. With that, request emulation is complete. Now, compile the script by clicking the button on the tool bar of Figure 71. Once compilation becomes successful, run the script by clicking on the button.

    Note:

    You are advised to compile and execute the test script at various stages of development, so that issues can be detected early and attacked easily.

  90. Upon successful execution of the script, a message box informing you of the success will appear. You are advised to disable this message box and restore the desktop instead. To change the playback settings to reflect this, select Playback Options from the Playback menu on the script window.

    Figure 72 : Playback options

  91. In the General tab that opens by default (see Figure 72), deselect the Display Script Complete Dialog check box, and enable the Restore Desktop at Script End check box. Finally, click the ok button.
  92. Similarly, by default, the standard_timeout period is set to 50 seconds. This default setting can be changed using the General tab of Figure 72.