Application-Specific Custom Dashboard

Though the contents of the system/network/application dashboards are customizable, the right to customization rests with the Admin and Supermonitor users alone, and not all users to the eG monitoring console. This means that if any monitor user logs into the console, he/she will only be allowed to use the pre-defined dashboards. These dashboards, as we know, will focus on only those metrics that an Admin or Supermonitor has configured - a normal monitor user can neither customize the layout nor alter the contents of such dashboards. 

Also, note that by default, dashboards are available only for those applications that are supported out-of-the-box by the eG Enterprise. For in-house/legacy applications that may have been integrated into the eG Enterprise using the Integration Console plugin, ready-to-use dashboards are not available.

Therefore, to enable every user with monitoring rights to personalize his/her dashboard experience, the eG monitoring console allows the creation of Custom Dashboards. These dashboards can be designed for both existing applications and legacy applications. This capability empowers users to control what data is to be displayed in the dashboards and how to present it (whether to use dial charts or digital displays or comparison graphs or tables). This way, users can see what they want to see in the dashboards.

Using the eG monitoring console, a user can build a custom dashboard for a specific host/application, or can design a dashboard to visually compare performance across multiple applications. The sections that follow will discuss both these custom dashboard options.

To build custom dashboard for a particular application, do the following:

  1. By default, clicking on a component in the component list page will lead you to the Layer tab page of that component, where the layer model, tests, and measurements pertaining to that component will be displayed.
  2. If a custom dashboard is enabled for that component, then a Custom tab page will appear next to the Layer tab page. If custom dashboard templates pre-exist for the component in question, then, upon clicking on the Custom tab page, the eG Enterprise system will automatically sort these dashboard templates in the ascending order of their names, and display the first template in the sorted list in the Custom tab page. However, if no dashboard templates pre-exist for the said component, then a message to the effect will appear, as depicted by Figure 1 below:

    Figure 1 : The message that appears when no dashboard templates have been configured for a component

  3. To create a new dashboard, click on the icon at the top of Figure 1. Figure 2 will then appear displaying a Personal Templates section with the complete list of custom dashboard templates that pre-exist, regardless of the component with which they are associated.

    Figure 2 : List of dashboard templates

  4. To modify a dashboard template, click on the Modify Template link corresponding to it, and to view a dashboard template, click on View. If you want to delete any of the listed templates, select the check box that pre-fixes the template and click the Delete button. To remove all templates, select the Select All check box, and then click the Delete button. If required, you can even modify how a dashboard template is to be shared with the other users registered with the eG Enterprise system. For this, you will have to click on the Modify Sharing link that corresponds to the template.
  5. If other users have shared one/more dashboards that they created with you, then a separate Templates shared by other Users section will appear below the Personal Templates section (as depicted by Figure 3). This section will list all those dashboard templates that other users have shared with you, along with the names of the users who shared the dashboard (in the shared by column). Shared dashboards can only be viewed (not modified or deleted). Clicking on the View link against a dashboard template in this section will allow you to view a shared dashboard.

    Figure 3 : Viewing the list of templates shared by other users

  6. To build a new dashboard, click on the Build Dashboard button. Provide a name for the new dashboard template in the Dashboard Name text box in Figure 3. Then, from the Application list, pick the component for which the new dashboard is being configured. By default, the component in question will be selected from the Application list. Then, by selecting an option from the Sharing list, indicate how you want to share the dashboard with other users to the eG Enterprise system. By default, the Private option is chosen from this list. This indicates that the user building the dashboard is alone to authorized to view/modify/delete the dashboard. Selecting the Public option allows all users to the eG Enterprise system to view (not modify/delete) the dashboard that is being created. To share the dashboard with specific users to the eG Enterprise system, select the Share option from the Sharing list. Then, from the Available Users list that then appears (see Figure 5), select the users with whom you want to share the dashboard, and click the Grant button. This will transfer the selection to the Selected Users list. To revoke the share, select one/more users from the Selected Users list and click the Revoke button.

    Figure 4 : Creating a new dashboard template

    Figure 5 : Sharing the dashboard template with specific users

    Note:

    Users with whom you share your dashboard template - i.e., users in the Selected Users list of Figure 5 - will only be allowed to view the dashboard, and not modify/delete it.

  7. Finally, click the Create button to add the new dashboard template.
  8. Doing so will invoke Figure 6.

    Figure 6 : The Design window of the custom dashboard

  9. Using Figure 6, you can design 'look and feel' of the new dashboard. To help you in building your dashboard, a tool box is provided to you, as indicated by Figure 6. The tools available in this tool box have been detailed in the table below:

    Tool

    Tool Name

    Current Alerts

    Event History

    Configurations

    Performance Indicators

    Comparison Table

    DD Comparison Table

    Comparison Graph

    Timeline Chart

    Digital Chart

    Dial Chart

  10. If you want your dashboard to display a quick summary of the problems that the target component is currently experiencing, then, click on the tool in the tool box. This will insert a Current Alerts section in your custom dashboard as depicted by Figure 7.

    Figure 7 : Inserting a Current Alerts section in the dashboard

  11. In real-time, the Current Alerts section will display the number of problem events currently associated with the target component, and will also reveal how these problems are distributed based on problem priority.
  12. If you want to include an event history in your dashboard, then, click on the tool in the tool box. A bar graph will be inserted in your dashboard, as depicted by Figure 8.

    Figure 8 : Including an Event History in your dashboard

  13. At runtime, the event history bar graph will reveal the History of Events experienced by the target component during the last 24 hours (by default). If need be, you can pick another duration from the History of Events during last list in Figure 8, so as to override the default duration of 24 hours. 
  14. If you want to view the basic configuration of the target component in the dashboard, then, click on the tool in the tool box. This will add a Configuration section to the dashboard, as depicted by Figure 9.

    Figure 9 : Adding a Configuration section to the custom dashboard

  15. You can even choose the type of configuration information that you want displayed in the Configuration section. For this purpose, click on the Please Click here to Configure icon within that section in Figure 9. This will invoke a Properties window as depicted by Figure 10. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, select the test that reports the configuration metrics of interest to you. This will populate the Measures list with the measures reported by the chosen test. Now, from the Measures list, pick the measures to be added to the Configuration section. You can add multiple measures reported by multiple tests to this section. To remove any measure from the section, simply deselect the check box alongside the measure in the Configuration section.

    Figure 10 : Configuring the configuration metrics to be displayed in the Configuration section

  16. To focus on specific metrics reported by a component so that you are promptly alerted to any change in the state of those measures, you can mark such metrics as key performance indicators and include them in the Key Performance Indicators section in your dashboard. To add this section to your dashboard, click on the tool in the tool box. Figure 11 will then appear.

    Figure 11 : Inserting the Key Performance Indicators section in the dashboard

  17. To configure the metrics to be displayed in the Key Performance Indicators section, click on the Please Click here to Configure icon within that section in Figure 12.

    Figure 12 : Configuring the metrics to be included in the Key Performance Indicators section

  18. A Properties pop-up then appears (see Figure 12). From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, select the test that reports the critical metrics. This will populate the Measures list with the measures reported by the chosen test. Now, from the Measures list, pick the measures to be added to the Key Performance Indicators section. You can add multiple measures reported by multiple tests to the Key Performance Indicators section. To remove any measure from the section, simply deselect the check box alongside the measure in the Key Performance Indicators section.
  19. Sometimes, you may want to quickly compare the performance of one/more measures across a set of descriptors, so that potential bottlenecks and the descriptors responsible for the same can be isolated. For instance, you may want to compare disk space usage across disk partitions to identify the partition that may soon run out of space. To facilitate this comparative analysis, you may want to include a comparison table in your dashboard. To do so, simply click on the tool in the tool box. A new section will be inserted in your dashboard layout, as depicted by Figure 13.

    Figure 13 : Adding a Comparison Table to your dashboard

  20. To indicate which measures need to be compared across descriptors, click on the Please Click here to Configure icon within the Table Header section in Figure 13. A Properties window will then pop-up as shown by Figure 14. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, pick a descriptor-based test, and then pick one/more measures reported by that test from the Measures list. Note that a single comparison table can be associated with a single test only. Then, click the ok button in the Properties pop-up. Upon clicking ok, the name of the test will become the title of your comparison table section, and the chosen measures will be listed therein. To remove a measure from the comparison table, simply deselect the check box alongside that measure in the comparison table section in your dashboard.

    Figure 14 : Configuring the measures to be compared in the comparison table

    Figure 15 : Selected measures appearing in the 'Comparison Table' placeholder

  21. Sometimes, you may want to comparatively analyze the information provided in the detailed diagnosis of a test in order to understand the problem reported by that test better and to accurately isolate the source of the problem. For instance, the detailed diagnosis of the Free memory measure of the System Details test of a host provides the PID (process ID) of the top memory-consuming processes on that host and the percentage of memory consumed by each process. In the event of a memory contention on the host, you can use the detailed diagnosis to compare the memory usage of the processes and identify that process which is responsible for the memory drain. If this comparison is available in a custom dashboard, you can get to the root-cause of the memory drain much quickly. To display such useful detailed diagnosis information in your custom dashboard, insert a DD Comparison Table section in it. For this, click on the icon in the tool box.
  22. This will insert a DD Comparison Table Header in your dashboard.

    Figure 16 : Inserting a DD Comparison Table section in the dashboard

  23. Once you click on the Please Click here to Configure link in Figure 16, a Properties dialog box will appear. In the Tests drop-down list here, the tests for which the 'detailed diagnosis' capability is enabled will be listed. Once you select a test from this list, the measures for which detailed diagnosis is available will be populated in the Measures drop-down list. Note that you can select only one test and one measure pertaining to that test for viewing the detailed diagnosis in a single DD Comparison table. You may add more DD Comparison tables if you wish to view the detailed diagnosis for more measures. Upon choosing a measure, a DD Columns list will appear. Here, select the columns that you wish to view in the dashboard and click the Ok button. At runtime, the DD Comparison Table section will display chosen DD columns in a tabular format.

    Figure 17 : Selecting the DD columns to be included in the DD Comparison Table section

  24. If you want to graphically compare the values of specific measures across their descriptors, then, you can insert a Comparison Graph in your dashboard. Such a graph will enable you to accurately identify the best/worst performers in a chosen performance area. To insert this graph in your dashboard, click on the tool in your tool box. A section depicted by Figure 18 will then be included in your dashboard design.

    Figure 18 : Including a comparison graph in your dashboard

  25. To configure the measure to be compared using the comparison graph, click on the graph titled Unconfigured in Figure 18. A Properties window will then pop-up as shown by Figure 19. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, pick a descriptor-based test, and then pick a measure reported by that test from the Measures list. Then, click the ok button. Upon clicking ok, the name of the chosen measure will appear as the title of your comparison graph section (see Figure 20).

    Figure 19 : Configuring the measure for the comparison graph

    Figure 20 : The selected measure appearing as the title of the Comparison Graph section

  26. To historically analyze performance of a measure, you can include a Timeline Graph in your dashboard. For this purpose, click on the tool in the tool box. A measure graph depicted by Figure 21 will then get appended to your dashboard as shown by Figure 21.

    Figure 21 : Including a timeline graph in the dashboard

  27. To configure the measure for which the history graph is to be generated, click on the graph titled Unconfigured in Figure 21. A Properties window will then pop-up as shown by Figure 22. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, pick a test, and then pick a measure reported by that test from the Measures list. Then, click the ok button (see Figure 22). Doing so will set the name of the chosen measure as the title of your history graph section.

    Figure 22 : Configuring a measure for the history graph in the dashboard

  28. To receive quick updates on the current status and values of critical measures, you can include digital displays and/or dial charts in your dashboard for each such measure. To add a digital display to your dashboard, click on the tool in the tool box. A digital graph titled Unconfigured will then appear in the custom dashboard (see Figure 23). To associate the graph with a particular measure, click on the digital graph in Figure 23.

    Figure 23 : Adding a digital graph to the dashboard

  29. A Properties window will then pop-up as shown by Figure 24. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, pick a test, and then pick a measure reported by that test from the Measures list. Then, click the ok button. Upon picking ok, you will find that the title of the digital graph changes to reflect the measure name.

    Figure 24 : Configuring the digital graph in the custom dashboard

  30. To insert a dial chart, click on the tool in the tool box. A section titled Unconfigured will then appear, as shown by Figure 25. For configuring the measure to be represented by the dial chart, click on the Unconfigured section in Figure 25.

    Figure 25 : Inserting a dial chart into the custom dashboard

  31. A Properties window will then pop-up as shown by Figure 26. From the Tests list in the Properties pop-up, pick a test, and then pick a measure reported by that test from the Measures list. Then, click the ok button. Upon clicking ok, you will find that the title of the dial chart changes to reflect the measure name.

    Note:

    • Dial charts can be configured only for those measures that report percentage values.
    • If the Show threshold flag is enabled, then, only the Absolute Thresholds configured for the chosen measure will be displayed in the dial chart.

    Figure 26 : Configuring a measure for the dial chart

  32. At any time during dashboard design, if you close the tool box by clicking on the X button at its right, top corner, you can restore the tool box by clicking on the icon that appears at the top of the custom dashboard.
  33. Once you are done designing the dashboard, you can preview it by clicking on the at the top of Figure 26. Figure 27 and Figure 28 depict a sample preview.

    Figure 27 : A sample preview of the custom dashboard

    Figure 28 : A sample preview of the custom dashboard

  34. To return to the design mode of the dashboard being viewed, click on the Modify button next to the Templates list in Figure 2. To modify another dashboard, simply select the dashboard name from the Templates list and click the Modify button next to it.